aboutface-mobile-menu-hide_03
aboutface-mobile-menu-show_03
facebook twitter youtube tumblr share this

3

Totally natural. And we’re not talking about her breasts.

 

Questions to Consider:

  • What is the first thing you see in these ads?
  • What are the ads selling?
  • Where is the text positioned?
  • How does the advertiser want you to feel?

What We Think:

For starters, the name “Natrelle” sounds awfully close to the word “natural.” Though we all know that breast augmentations are not natural to any degree, this ad is trying to give us the impression that this specific type of cosmetic surgery will have your new breasts appear natural. The first line of text is placed directly in front of the woman’s breast, drawing your eyes in that direction. The woman also appears confident and proud, so the ad is also trying to tell you that you will also feel that way once you have new breasts. And one variation on this ad reads, “You know that feeling when you find the perfect figure,” telling us that we will overall feel a lot better about ourselves once we have larger breasts and that a woman with large breasts is closer to having “the perfect figure,” when there is absolutely no such thing. These Natrelle ads, like a lot of the portrayals of cosmetic surgery in media, make breast augmentation seem like such a breeze. They associate the surgery with things that are easier to get, when breast surgery is actually a huge deal and there are major risks involved.
— Holly Crimmins (About-Face intern) and Jennifer Berger

Contact

Allergan, Inc.
P.O. Box 19534
Irvine, CA 92623
Phone: (714) 246-4500 (ask for Rena)

Elle Magazine
1633 Broadway
New York, NY 10019
Phone: (212) 767-5800
E-mail: Click here if you have something to say to Elle.

Allure Magazine
4 Times Square, Suite 10
New York, NY 10036
Phone: (212) 286-2860
E-mail: Click here if you have something to say to Allure.

Learn how to write a great complaint letter here.